First Stop, Sao Paulo, Brasil

???, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Vinte e Tres de Maio Avenue,, Sao Paulo, Brazil

The Lonely Planet sums it up perfectly: “São Paulo is a monster. Enormous, intimidating and, at first glance at least, no great beauty.” People I know in Boston, who are originally from Brazil, warned me that I need to watch myself there at all times because I will clearly look like a foreigner and be an easy target for mugging. It is embarrassing to admit but… I initially wondered why I decided to stop here, on my way to Bahia province. I am staying with friends and am, as it turns out, glad I made this stop-over before heading east. They have graciously given me a small taste of this immense, sprawling, but likeable place.

Downtown, Sao Paulo, Brasil

Downtown, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Vila Madalena, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Vila Madalena, Sao Paulo, Brazil

There are over twenty million people who live in the greater metropolitan area of Sao Paulo. The divide between the haves and the have-nots of this city is great; the inequality is blatant. Many people live on the street and the barbed wire industry clearly thrives. The government and private citizens do not invest in long-term programmes that will get people off the street and re-integrated into society; the payback probably seems to distant.

Beco do Batman (Batman's Alley), Sao Paulo, Brazil

Beco do Batman (Batman’s Alley), Sao Paulo, Brazil

Graffiti is everywhere (as it turns out, Sao Paulo is known for its graffiti artists). I have learned that, as the city developed there was little planning, zoning, and vision. It appears to be a hodgepodge of a metropolis. Vehicular traffic is nothing but one giant snarl. Despite all the concrete, however, lush green is everywhere and the songs of birds surround you all day long, giving a clear sense that rain forest cannot be far away. Trees line the streets and there are a number of large parks here. I have also discovered that Sao Paulo is a superb place for a “foodie” like me. There are hundreds of cafes, bistros, and good, cheap food joints. Since my time here is short I have barely scratched the surface and, uncharacteristically, I have hardly explored this city on foot. Nonetheless, it is clear to me that this is a sophisticated city full of culture, life, and history.

In just a few days, I warmed up to this city that, at first sight, appeared to be a grey, concrete jungle that I thought would hold no interest. Already I can say that Sao Paulo is a region that, had I more time, I might learn to appreciate.

Downtown, Sao Paulo, Brasil

Downtown, Sao Paulo, Brasil

Beco do Batman (Batman's Alley), Sao Paulo, Brazil

Vila Madalena, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Beco do Batman (Batman's Alley), Sao Paulo, Brazil

Vila Madalena, Sao Paulo, Brazil

???, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Santo Amaro Avenue Sao Paulo, Brazil

???, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Santa Amaro Avenue, Sao Paulo, Brazil

???, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Santa Amaro Avenue, Sao Paulo, Brazil

6 thoughts on “First Stop, Sao Paulo, Brasil

  1. rsheffer

    I have to say that the poverty looks pretty daunting (especially in your shots of buildings) – however the graffiti is really awesome and you have captured some great pieces.
    Thanks and have a great trip.

    Reply
    1. Tamar Granovsky Post author

      the poverty is daunting and especially so as one drives into the city from the airport. now that i have done a little exploring i have been able to see that wealthy neighbourhoods abut very poor ones and housing projects are literally plopped down where there is empty land – even if there is nothing else around, for the inhabitants. The dinginess is everywhere but so is lushness. where i am staying, you cannot get around unless you have a car. the immediate neighbourhood is middle class and safe to wander but one street in the wrong direction and it is no longer safe. sao paulo has attracted many immigrants and is an extremely diverse city. it is a city one has to wrap one’s brain around to accept. kind of like china – although china is practically impenetrable.

      Reply

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